Amerous

Overview

Hormone” Harry Douglas (from The Sensuous Senator) is back to his old shenanigans again, but this time as the American Ambassador to Great Britain. He tells his wife Lois, that he has arranged a golf outing in Scotland for the weekend. Lois in turn tells Harry that she too will be gone for the weekend at a spa, and that their daughter Debbie will be gone visiting a girlfriend. Each then tells Perkins, their newly hired butler in their country home, of their plans. He stoically watches as each of them leave for the weekend. So… Where’s the farce? Harry, secretly returns to the empty house, having planned a romantic rendezvous with a sexy, next-door neighbour Marianne. This is no ordinary rendezvous as they plan to act out their fantasies, she a French maid and Harry as Tarzan. Debbie returns with her boyfriend Joe, believing they have the house to themselves for the whole weekend. Harry’s secretary, Faye Baker, and Captain South of the U.S. Marine Corps arrive in the wake of a bomb threat at the embassy, and must set-up embassy communications in Harry’s country home. Captain South places a squad of marines around the perimeter, and everybody is sealed in. It soon becomes apparent, that Faye was not hired for her secretarial abilities.

Meet the Cast

Perkins…………………………………Peter Gibbon

Debbie Douglas……………………Louise Davidson

Harry Douglas………………………Nigel Venning

Lois Douglas…………………………Morag Edwards

Marian Murdoch…………………..Teresa Page

Joe………………………………………..Scott Morris

Captain South……………………….James Fear

Faye Baker……………………………Gemma Milford

 

Directed by………………………….Simon Lee

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Meet the Author

Michael Parker has been active in the theatre almost all his life. At age fourteen, in England where he was born and raised, he won the title role in a regional production of Terence Rattigan’s play, The Winslow Boy, for which he received a “Best Actor of the Year” award. By age seventeen he was touring with The National Shakespearean Youth Company. He graduated in the top 3% of his class from The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, but describes his five years of military service as “uneventful”. There being few employment opportunities in civilian life for infantry anti-tank specialists, at age twenty-three he emigrated to Canada where he began a Temporary Office Help business, which proved so successful that he was able to retire ten years later and move to the Caribbean. Over the succeeding years, while living in Bermuda, Grand Cayman, and The Turks and Caicos Islands, he was free again to indulge his passion for the theatre. Never far from The United States, he was able to audition for roles in many Florida Theatres. As an English actor, working in America, Mr. Parker became acutely aware of the difficulties experienced by American theatre companies, in producing English works, in particular modern farces. Re-creating the wide range of English dialects is almost impossible, and many of the best farces simply do not “translate” well into “American”. So he challenged himself to write a play which would integrate all the best loved and most familiar devices of the traditional British farce into a distinctly American setting. This had to be a play in which the verbal, visual, and above all, the circumstantial humour would be immediately available to American audiences. The result was an “American Farce”, The Sensuous Senator, which was inspired by the then current sex scandal involving Senator Gary Hart. Encouraged by the success of his first play, and the popularity of the British “naughty but nice” concept, he went on to write a sequel called, The Amorous Ambassador. The rest, as they say, is history. In 1999, he wrote The Lone Star Love Potion, Hotbed Hotel in 2000,  There’s a Burglar in My Bed and Whose Wives Are They Anyway? in 2002, Who’s In Bed with the Butler? in 2003, and Never Kiss a Naughty Nanny in 2006. He co-authored a play with his wife Susan, Sin, Sex & the CIA, in 2006, Sex Please We’re Sixty! in 2008, and What is Susan’s Secret? in 2010. His plays are published by Samuel French.