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Overview

This play is based on an 1890’s story by Oscar Wilde about Lord Arthur Savile’s who is engaged to lovely Sybil Merton. Her pet chiromantist Podgers has read Lord Arthur’s palm and foretold he would commit a murder. Lord Arthur desires a blissful married life and therefore feels duty bound to get the murder over with first. Despite help from his butler and the cheerful anarchist Winkelkopf, attempt after attempt fails. Then news comes that Podgers is a charlatan: Lord Arthur is free and the carriage awaits to take him to the wedding rehearsal. Alas, it contains Winkelkopf’s newest bomb. Lord Arthur saves himself by tossing it into a horse trough. As the dust settles, two policemen appear and march the unhappy young man away and another postponement notice has to be sent to The Times.

Meet the Cast

Lord Arthur Savile…………………Simon Lee

Sybil Merton…..…………………….Gemma Milford

Baines…………………………………Nigel Venning

Lady Clemintina….…………………Morag Edwards

Lady Windermere..…..……………Teresa Page

Mr Podgers.…………….……………Scott Morris

Herr Winklekopf…………………….James Fear

Dean of Paddington.………………Gemma Milford

Lady Julia……………………………..Charlotte House

Nellie………………………………..Tina Sportel-Doyle

 

Directed by………………………….Peter Gibbon

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Meet the Author

Oscar Wilde (1854 – 1900) was born in Dublin to Sir William Wilde and his wife Jane. While studying at Oxford, he was fascinated by the aesthetic movement and eventually became a proponent for L’art pour l’art (“Art for Art’s Sake”), and wrote the award-winning poem Ravenna. After he graduated in 1879, he moved to Chelsea in London to establish a literary career. Upon graduating in 1879, he moved to London to review art, write poetry and lecture in the UK, the United States and Canada. In 1884, Mr. Wilde married Constance Lloyd and, in the course of their turbulent marriage, had two sons. His first and only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, was published in 1891 and has been adapted for the stage. Mr. Wilde’s first successful theatrical endeavor, Lady Windermere’s Fan, opened in 1892. He went on to create the wonderfully popular comedies A Woman of No Importance (1893), An Ideal Husband (1895), and the classic The Importance of Being Earnest (1895). Not long afterward, Mr. Wilde was publicly accused of homosexuality and arrested for gross indecency. During his time in prison he wrote De Profundis, a dramatic monologue and autobiography, which was addressed to his lover Bosie. Three years after his release in 1897, he died of cerebral meningitis in a rundown Paris hotel. Known for his philosophical wit and irreverent charm, Mr. Wilde is famously quoted as saying “Life is too important to be taken seriously.”