Cover Photo

Overview

Originally written in four acts, this stage classic was cut when first produced to provide time the obligatory curtain raiser of that era. Acts II and III were condensed into one act and two characters were omitted from the last act. In 1903 a Leipzig publisher issued a German translation of the four act play and from it the original English version, which was successfully produced at London’s Old Vic, was reconstructed.  This play was dedicated to our beloved and cherished friend…Chris Bartrop-Clist

Chris in his appearence as Earnest

Chris Bartrop Clist

When he passed away, Chris was our current Chairman and Director but also has been our set builder, stage manager and actor…….but above all a wonderful man and friend to so many of us at the Bleadon players.

He was kind, fiercely loyal and one of the hardest working men you could ever meet.

His wisdom, turn of phrase and wit will be sorely missed.  He certainly was larger than life and we loved him to bits.

Thank you Chris for allowing us to be such a large part of your life.

We expect you are up there now ringing your bell – “5 minutes to curtain up” and muttering under your breath “ bloody actors “!!!

Meet the Cast

John Worthing…..……………….James Fear

Gwendolen Fairfax………………Gemma Milford

Algernon Moncrieff……………..Simon Lee

Cecily Cardew….…………………..Scarlett Blair

Lane…………………..……………Scott Morris

Lady Bracknell……….……………Teresa Page

Rev. Canon Chasuble.………….Nigel Venning

Miss Prism…………………………Brenda Shrewsbury

Lady Julia…………………………..Charlotte House

Merriman…………………………..David Shephard

 

Directed by………………………….Chris Bartrop-Clist

oscar_wilde_1854-1900_1889_may_23-_picture_by_w-_and_d-_downey

Meet the Author

Oscar Wilde (1854 – 1900) was born in Dublin to Sir William Wilde and his wife Jane. While studying at Oxford, he was fascinated by the aesthetic movement and eventually became a proponent for L’art pour l’art (“Art for Art’s Sake”), and wrote the award-winning poem Ravenna. After he graduated in 1879, he moved to Chelsea in London to establish a literary career. Upon graduating in 1879, he moved to London to review art, write poetry and lecture in the UK, the United States and Canada. In 1884, Mr. Wilde married Constance Lloyd and, in the course of their turbulent marriage, had two sons. His first and only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, was published in 1891 and has been adapted for the stage. Mr. Wilde’s first successful theatrical endeavor, Lady Windermere’s Fan, opened in 1892. He went on to create the wonderfully popular comedies A Woman of No Importance (1893), An Ideal Husband (1895), and the classic The Importance of Being Earnest (1895). Not long afterward, Mr. Wilde was publicly accused of homosexuality and arrested for gross indecency. During his time in prison he wrote De Profundis, a dramatic monologue and autobiography, which was addressed to his lover Bosie. Three years after his release in 1897, he died of cerebral meningitis in a rundown Paris hotel. Known for his philosophical wit and irreverent charm, Mr. Wilde is famously quoted as saying “Life is too important to be taken seriously.”